Do HOAs Affect Home Values?

Do HOAs Affect Home Values?

Research suggests that HOA’s have an effect on home values – almost always for the better.

“Theory does suggest that  HOAs increase home value. The rights and responsibilities that come with an HOA affect a home’s value, just as do the number of  bedrooms and the quality of the local schools.  A great house in a community with a poorly designed or badly managed HOA is a great house in a bad neighborhood.” – Amanda Agan and Alexander Tabarrok , George Mason University.

The Downside

Since most homes built in America today come with an HOA, the rare negative effect might be where your monthly HOA fees are substantially higher than those for a similar home in another neighborhood.  We sometimes see this where there have not been adequate maintenance reserves collected over the years and they’re having to play “catch up”; or when there has had to be a special assessment (because they didn’t have adequate reserves).  In that case, the price will have to be lower to reflect the additional cost of ownership to the Buyer.  How much lower?  Well, you could take the difference in monthly HOA fees, use that as the payment toward mortgage principal at the prevailing rates, and calculate the amount of mortgage that would pay off over 30 years.  There’s your price difference.

The Upsides

The advantages, although not as clear-cut economically, are

  1. Covenants. Also called Deed Restrictions. These are rules creating standards for quality and appearance of the home and lot. They’re usually enforced by the HOA.  Some people will bristle at the thought of anyone telling them what they can or can’t do with their home, but consider that the characteristic of “conformity” carries only a positive connotation (and value adjustment) in the language of appraisal.  Hence, the fact that neighborhoods where all the homes look nice tend to sell for more. http://www.neighborhoodlink.com/article/Association/Value_Of_HOA
  2. Local Control.  Part of the premise of having a HOA is that local residents can manage their neighborhood better than the various divisions of city government. That’s why the HOA has control over streets, landscape maintenance, amenities, etc.  In fact, Denver Government even allows non-HOA neighborhoods to be an integral part of planning, development, code enforcement, variances, and other functions through RNOs (Registered Neighborhood Organizations).  In Winston Downs, we really have a RNO which has “HOA” in it’s name. http://www.denvergov.org/maps/map/neighborhoodorganizations.
    Some analysts even point to the rise in “Local Governments” (http://object.cato.org/sites/cato.org/files/serials/files/regulation/2005/9/v28n3-2.pdf), noting that HOAs lead the way in providing more individualized, cheaper and better quality services than can be provided by City and State agencies.
  3. Placemaking and Community.  “Placemaking is a quiet movement that reimagines public spaces as the heart of every community, in every city. It’s a transformative approach that inspires people to create and improve their public places. Placemaking strengthens the connection between people and the places they share.”  http://www.pps.org/reference/what_is_placemaking.  HOAs are made up of neighbors, neighbors make a community, and communities strengthen and enforce shared values.  Strong communities help drive strong home values.

Winston Downs HOA

With all that said, the HOA (really an RNO) for Winston Downs Neighborhood is entirely voluntary, and at this writing a bargain at $15/year per family. The neighborhood doesn’t carry any deed restrictions, so code enforcement is pretty much up to local government.  But the RNO is an active participant in organizing community activities, weighing in on local issues, schools, development and code variance requests which impact the neighborhood.  http://www.wdhoa.org/

 

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