Colorado Sellers need CO Detectors

Colorado Sellers need CO Detectors

Carbon Monoxide Detectors Now Required in ALL Colorado Residential Homes for Sale (HB-1091)

If you are looking to sell your Denver home, you now need to make sure that you have Carbon Monoxide (CO) detectors in your homes.

What is Carbon Monoxide?

Carbon Monoxide is an odorless, colorless gas that can have harmful – fatal effects on humans and pets.  According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA):

“Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless and toxic gas. Because it is impossible to see, taste or smell the toxic fumes, CO can kill you before you are aware it is in your home. At lower levels of exposure, CO causes mild effects that are often mistaken for the flu. These symptoms include headaches, dizziness, disorientation, nausea and fatigue. The effects of CO exposure can vary greatly from person to person depending on age, overall health and the concentration and length of exposure.” (EPA.gov)

What IS the new Carbon Monoxide Detector Law?

Colorado House Bill 1091 (HB-1091):

“Requires any existing single-family dwelling or dwelling unit of an existing multi-family dwelling offered for sale or transfer on or after July 1, 2009, that has a fuel-burning heater or appliance, a fireplace, or an attached garage to have an operational carbon monoxide alarm installed within a specified distance of each room lawfully used for sleeping purposes.”

What does this mean for Denver home sellers?

If you are looking to sell your Denver home, you will need to install (or have installed) a Carbon Monoxide detector. Here are the basics of this new law.

A Carbon Monoxide detector …

  • must be installed 15 feet of every room lawfully used for sleeping, and
  • must be hard-wired or plugged into a non-switch outlet and have a battery back-up, and
  • must produce a distinct, audible alarm.

Right now, Denver Realtors® can help you locate qualified Carbon Monoxide detectors for your home.

What if you don’t put them in?

Well, I’m not an attorney and this is not legal advice.  So consult your own attorney, or just read the law below and use your head.  There are no penalties built into the law . .  . yet.  But you probably don’t want to be a test case.  What’s clear is that if you put them in like you’re supposed to, you will be “immune from liability” in case something happens to the next owner or tenant of the house due to carbon monoxide.

38-45-106. Immunity from liability.

ANY PERSON WHO INSTALLS OR MAINTAINS, IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE MANUFACTURERPUBLISHED INSTRUCTIONS IN EXISTENCE AT THE TIME OF INSTALLATIONA CARBON MONOXIDE ALARM SHALL HAVE NO LIABILITY, DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY, TO ANY PERSON WITH RESPECT TO THE OPERATIONMAINTENANCE, OR EFFECTIVENESS OF THE CARBON MONOXIDE ALARM.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.